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Current Graduate Students

Anthropology Graduate Student Association

The Northwestern Anthropology Graduate Student Association (est. 2012) is a student-run group that holds quarterly meetings for all anthropology graduate students, hosts occasional workshops and other events, and provides mentorship and orientation for new students. AGSA liaison committee members, elected yearly, coordinate activities and meet with faculty members on issues of interest to graduate students. The liaison committee can be reached at agsa.northwestern@gmail.com.

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Ashley Ngozi Agbasoga (she/they)

Ashley Ngozi Agbasoga (she/they)

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate Summer 2018)
Regional Focus: Latin America and the Caribbean/Abya Yala; México

ashleyagbasoga2021@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Ashley Ngozi Agbasoga’s dissertation, titled We Dance With Existence: Black-Indigenous Placemaking in the Land Known as México and Beyond, illuminates how Black, Indigenous, and Black-Indigenous women engage in placemaking practices that reveal and unsettle notions of race, place, and (nation-) statehood in México. Merging ethnographic and archival research with theories and methodologies from Anthropology, History, Black Studies, and Native/Indigenous Studies, Agbasoga argues that Black-Indigenous placemaking practices create two critical ruptures: first, in the (re)produced bifurcation of blackness and indigeneity, and second, in the Mexican state’s racialization of its territory as mestizo. This work contributes to conversations in Black and Indigenous studies, as well as a long history of Black/Indigenous political movements throughout the hemisphere and globally.

Sofyan Ansori

Sofyan Ansori

Arryman Scholar Fall 2018
Regional Focus: Indonesia

SofyanAnsori2022@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Sofyan's research examines the governance of forest fires in Indonesia, particularly to the way environmental interventions are embraced, lived, and/or contested by both local people and state actors.

Jacob Aronoff

Jacob Aronoff

Biological Anthropology (PhD Candidate Winter 2021)
Regional Focus:

JacobAronoff2022@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Developmental plasticity and life history theory, quantifying brain energetics using ultrasound, developing a field-friendly cell culture method for studying inflammatory regulation

Bobbie Benavidez (she/her)

Bobbie Benavidez (she/her)

Biological Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2019)
Regional Focus:

bobbiebenavidez2022@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Indigenous knowledge, human population genetics & health disparities. 

Sarah Breiter (she/her)

Sarah Breiter (she/her)

Archaeology (PhD Candidate Spring 2020)
Regional Focus: East Anglia, Suffolk, Bury St. Edmunds

SarahBreiter2017@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: I explore the environmental ideologies of the feudal to capitalist transition through standing buildings. Project Website: East Anglia Building Landscapes

Austin Bryan

Austin Bryan

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2018)
Regional Focus: Eastern Africa

AustinBryan2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Federalism, the East African Federation, and the development of a new territory of freedom  

Margaret Butler (she/her)

Margaret Butler (she/her)

Biological Anthropology (PhD Candidate Spring 2020)
Regional Focus: Chicagoland, Illinois, USA. Traditional homelands of the people of the Council of Three Fires, the Ojibwe, Potawatomi, and Odawa; as well as the Menominee, Miami and Ho-Chunk.

MargaretButler2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Margaret’s research focuses on postpartum health, specifically related to human lactation. Applying mixed methods and a biosocial approach, her dissertation research examines the relationship between breastfeeding and postpartum depression among Chicagoland birthing parents participating in an on-going, hospital-based study. In addition to her graduate studies, Margaret became a certified lactation counselor in 2018 and is an active member of the Chicago Region Breastfeeding Task Force. Twitter Handle @bioanthmags  

Kyle Craig (he/him)

Kyle Craig (he/him)

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate 2019)
Regional Focus: Middle East and North Africa/Jordan/Amman

KyleCraig2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: My dissertation examines the intersections of youth temporalities, the affective resonances of urban material, and the politics of public aesthetics via the graffiti/street art scene in Amman, Jordan. I attend to the multitude ways Amman-based graffiti/street artists channel their experiences of Amman as an “empty” city with high unemployment and scant spaces for youth leisure and creative expression into public art projects that for them represent small steps in the constitution of the ideal future city. One core impetus for this project is to underscore the need to move beyond the often restricting and romanticized framework of “resistance art” when examining the nexus between youth politics and aesthetics, particularly in the MENA region.

Foroogh Farhang

Foroogh Farhang

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate Spring 2018)
Regional Focus: Middle East, Iran

forooghfarhang2015@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Social suffering, post-war trauma, ethnic/religious minorities

Livia Garofalo

Livia Garofalo

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate 2017)
Regional Focus: United States, Latin America

livia.garofalo@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), subjectivity, care, trauma, injury, the state

Gerpha Gerlin

Gerpha Gerlin

Medical/MPH (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: United States, United Kingdom, Haiti

ggerlin@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: I am a PhD/MPH student & Science in Human Culture Cluster Fellow, working around issues related to psychiatric disease & disablement, identity politics, knowledge-production economies, and implementation science. I am crafting a multi-sited dissertation project that critically engages aspects and consequences of custodial care for psychiatric consumers, survivors, and ex-patients who have lost (or “forfeited”), and are trying to recover, the ability to participate fully and freely in the world.

Syd González (they/them)

Syd González (they/them)

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: Eagle Pass, Texas (Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas)

sydneygonzalez2026@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Syd González is currently a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology and a Mellon Fellow in Gender & Sexuality Studies at Northwestern. They will research the embodiment of machismo among Mexican, Mexican American, and Kickapoo communities through material culture and performance. The methodology they will utilize is based on Linda Tuhiwai Smith's indigenous research methods in addition to collaborative, community engaged practices. Their research interests include queerness, indigeneity, borderlands, decolonization (but not as a metaphor), and what exactly a "Latinx community" is. Syd earned their Bachelor of Science in Anthropology from the University of Houston. Academia Page

Kacey Grauer (she/her)

Kacey Grauer (she/her)

Archaeology (PhD Candidate 2017)
Regional Focus: The Maya Area (Belize)

KaceyGrauer2014@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: My research is about the relationships between inequality and the environment. Specifically, I examine how power structures and ontologies of landscape at the ancient Maya city of Aventura, Belize impacted commoners' and elites' ability to deal with drought. In my dissertation, I found that commoners and elites alike were able to access the equally important biophysical and metaphysical qualities of water, even at the height of drought. My ongoing research seeks to link archaeological research to present-day environmental justice concerns.

Bridgette Hulse (she/her)

Bridgette Hulse (she/her)

Archaeology (Doctoral Student Fall 2019)
Regional Focus: England

BridgetteHulse2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: I research agency and meaning in Medieval English graffiti. I use a combination of agency/resistance theory, semiotics, and buildings archaeology to analyze graffiti in context. I'm also working with the Center for the Scientific Studies in the Arts to employ various imaging techniques for my research.

Şeyma Kabaoğlu (she/her)

Şeyma Kabaoğlu (she/her)

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate Summer 2020)
Regional Focus: Middle East and North Africa; Europe; Turkey

seymakabaoglu@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Seyma’s research examines how people negotiate norms of ethical/pious finance in the everyday life of Islamic participation banking sector, in order to unpack relations of gender, class and ethnicity in terms of the changing political economy of Turkey. Her project explores the transformation of law and gendered norms of piety in the context of financial sectors of the MENA region, while highlighting previously invisible creative interpretative work Muslim women perform to create and maintain Islamic financial markets. Twitter Handle: @seymakabaoglu

Andrew Kim

Andrew Kim

Linguistic Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus:

andrewkim2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Sexuality/Gender; Race/Ethnicity; Embodiment; Intertextuality; Genre; Voice  

Elizabeth Koselka (she/her)

Elizabeth Koselka (she/her)

Biological Anthropology (PhD Candidate Winter 2019)
Regional Focus: Spain

ElizabethKoselka2022@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Drawing from a broad interest in biosocial pathways that produce health disparities, Elizabeth’s dissertation research explores how social pressure to fit into society impacts young immigrants’ eating practices and health in Spain.

Keegan Krause (he/him)

Keegan Krause (he/him)

Biological Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: North America, Latin America and the Caribbean

keegankrause2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Keegan Krause MPH, MA, works at the intersections of human biology, medical anthropology, and public health. Keegan’s work traces how complex social processes and structural conditions are embodied during critical points of biological and psychosocial development, and manifest in adverse health experiences through the life course. His prior work explored political economies of health, violence, and im/migration in informal occupational settings in the Dominican Republic’s tourism sector, and food security in the Sonora-Arizona borderlands. His current research explores the embodiment of adverse experiences during childhood and adolescence in im/migration contexts, and implications for life course and intergenerational health. Google Scholar Page ResearchGate Profile

(Rita) Dela Kuma

(Rita) Dela Kuma

Archaeology (PhD Candidate Spring 2019)
Regional Focus: Ghana

ritakuma2021@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Dela Kuma is a doctoral candidate in archaeology. Her research broadly investigates thepositionality of Africans and their embodied practices in global encounters. Dela’s dissertation examines how local notions of taste shaped the reception and consumption ofnew goods in the wake of the nineteenth century 'legitimate' trade in southeastern Ghana.

Melissa Manus

Melissa Manus

Biological Anthropology (PhD Candidate Spring 2020)
Regional Focus: Chicago, IL, USA (original homeland of the Ojibwe, Potawatomi, and Odawa people) and Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico (original homeland of the Totonac people)

MelissaManus2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: My research uses ecological and evolutionary perspectives to explore the development of the infant skin microbiome, with a focus on how social caregiving contributes to infant microbial acquisition. I use a mixed-methods approach that combines skin microbiome sample collection and detailed questionnaires in the field, microbial DNA analysis in the lab, bioinformatics, and social network analysis. I am particularly interested in applying my research to address the intersection of early life microbial exposures and global health inequities. GOOGLE SCHOLAR: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=G3sQ_V0AAAAJ&hl=en  

Kimberly McCabe

Kimberly McCabe

Biological Anthropology (PhD Candidate 2014)
Regional Focus: Cebu, the Philippines

kim.mccabe@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Urbanization, Infectious Disease, Health/Medicine, Inequality, Environment, Youth/Children

Shelby Mohrs (she/her)

Shelby Mohrs (she/her)

Archaeology (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: East Africa: Jamhuri wa Kenya (Kenya) & Jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania (Tanzania)

shelbymohrs2026@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Shelby is an archaeology student whose research uses paleoethnobotanical techniques to study how and what people in the past were eating and their everyday lives. Her current research focuses on the historical foodways of city-states of the Swahili Coast. Other research interests include ethnoarchaeology and political ecology.   Twitter Handle: @ShelbyAnnMohrs

Bahram Naderil

Bahram Naderil

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2017)
Regional Focus: Indonesia

BahramNaderil2017@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: I study the ways in which a Muslim 'waria' (transwomen) community in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, conceptualizes the notion of piety. I am specifically interested in exploring the aesthetics aspects of piety, the spectrum of embodying specific forms of gendered-aesthetics within a given time/place of religious devotion, and how the warias negotiate piety alongside social/political/economic challenges in their everyday lives. From my preliminary research, I learn that the warias' views on the sociology and theology of the body/soul relations, their views on sex/work, and their beliefs in the nature of human-god relations are highly fluid, are never universal, but are in direct relation to their individual perception/understanding of what piety and wariahood/transness mean.

Zachary Nissen (he/him)

Zachary Nissen (he/him)

Archaeology (PhD Candidate Spring 2019)
Regional Focus: Central America, Belize, The Maya

Zacharynissen2015@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Zach is an anthropological archaeologist who specializes in household studies of the pre-colonial Maya region of Central America. His dissertation research examines the everyday lives of urban commoner households to assess the relationship between urbanism and inequality during a period of environmental and sociopolitical stress. He has conducted research at the ancient Maya city of Aventura in the Corozal District of Belize as part of the Aventura Archaeology Project (AAP) since 2015. As a senior staff member, Zach has served as the Aventura Project's Ethics and Diversity Officer and helped to co-author the project's official statement on issues of archaeological ethics and diversity. In addition to archaeological research, he has co-organized annual community engagement events with Dr. Cynthia Robin and AAP staff members, as well as the Institute of Archaeology and Institute for Social and Cultural Research branches of the National Institute of Culture and History in Belize. Outside of archaeology and anthropology, Zach has a background in feminist and queer theory and has designed and taught courses as a Graduate Teaching Fellow in Gender and Sexuality Studies. Twitter Handle: @zachnissen

Vanessa Watters Opalo

Vanessa Watters Opalo

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate 2016)
Regional Focus: West Africa, Ghana, Togo

VanessaOpalo2013@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Economy and value; Social welfare; Anthropology of religion; Ethics; Catholicism and Pentecostal-charismatic Christianity

Hafsa Oubou

Hafsa Oubou

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate Spring 2018)
Regional Focus: Western Europe, Belgium

houbou@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: I examine how the intersection of education, religion, and race in public schools shapes religious and ethnic minorities in Belgium. After the 2016 attacks in Brussels, the teaching of Islam in public schools in francophone Belgium has become a point of contention, leading to a growing suspicion towards teachers of Islam and a heated debate among political parties to remove classes of religion from public schools. Using ethnographic methods from fieldwork in Brussels, I explore the controversies regarding teaching Islam in public education as a way to examine the question of Islam in Europe today.

Aydin Özipek

Aydin Özipek

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate 2016)
Regional Focus: Middle East & North Africa (MENA), Turkey

aydinozipek2018@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: My research is on the youth culturing program of the conservative AKP government in contemporary Turkey.

İdil Özkan

İdil Özkan

Linguistic Anthropology (PhD Candidate Summer 2020)
Research Location:

MahmureOzkan2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Idil’s research centers on how language ideologies provide a basis for imagining nation-state, identity, and citizenship in Spain’s nationality offer to Sephardi Jews, five hundred years after the Spanish Inquisition. Combining ethnographic research and linguistic anthropological methods, her dissertation looks at how Spanish lawmakers, as well as Sephardic applicants to Spanish citizenship deploy notions of “language” and “culture” in attesting, negating and signaling national identity, lineage, and belonging.

Julianna Perez (she/her)

Julianna Perez (she/her)

Biological Anthropology/MPH (PhD Candidate Spring 2018)
Regional Focus: Cebu, Philippines

JuliannaPerez2013@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: My research utilizes a biocultural framework on vitamin D production from infancy through young adulthood to investigate how societal practices and norms create and dictate the differing physical environments that women and men experience in Cebu, Philippines. By using the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, my research delves deeper into the cultural factors and biological mechanisms that interact to contribute to vitamin D deficiency in both men and women in Cebu, a society undergoing rapid urbanization, which is vital to understanding the long-term health consequences of vitamin D regulation.

Jennifer Porter-Lupu

Jennifer Porter-Lupu

Archaeology (PhD Candidate Winter 2019)

JenniferPorter-Lupu2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Historical archaeology; 19th and 20th century urban US; patent and proprietary medicine; health and healing; embodiment; sex work; queer theory; multivocality; public and community archaeology; marginalized and underrepresented histories; space and landscape

Ashish Premkumar

Ashish Premkumar

Cultural Anthropology (ND Fall 2017)
Regional Focus:

Research Content: The focus of Ashish’s research is on the issues of risk, stigma, and care associated with substance use during pregnancy. He has additional interests in the sociopolitical afterlives of biomedical studies, particularly randomized controlled trials.

Haley Ragsdale

Haley Ragsdale

Biological Anthropology (PhD Candidate Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: Cebu, Philippines

HaleyRagsdale2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Haley’s research centers on the evolution of human pregnancy and the placenta. She is primarily interested in how mother, placenta, and offspring negotiate energetic investment, resource exchange, and immune tolerance in different environmental contexts. She applies a parent-offspring conflict framework to maternal-fetal communication and the regulation of metabolism in both mother and offspring across the life course(s). In addition, Haley uses an evolutionary, comparative lens to interrogate why humans suffer from pregnancy complications more than any other mammal. To learn more about her work, check out https://haleyrags.wixsite.com/research. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Haley_Ragsdale https://twitter.com/bioanth_rags  

Daniela Maria Raillard (she/her)

Daniela Maria Raillard (she/her)

Archaeology (Doctoral Student Fall 2017)
Regional Focus: South American Andes & Amazon, Northeastern Perú, Chachapoya

danielaraillard2024@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Environment; Landscape; Indigeneity; Decoloniality; Heritage; Community-Engaged Research; GIS; Survey  Project Website (MAPA Chachapoya) Project Facebook Page (@mapachachapoya)  

Febi Ramadhan

Febi Ramadhan

Cultural Anthropology (Arryman Scholar 2018/Doctoral Student 2019)
Regional Focus: Indonesia

FebiRamadhan2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Febi's research explores the struggle of Indonesian Muslims with same-sex attraction to redefine their sexual desire as a divine trial from their God and assert their agency to overcome this test in order to become pious Muslims. He combines microhistory and ethnography to look at the everyday practices of Islamic piety as it relates to sexuality. Through this research, Febi intends to unpack the intricate relationship between individual agencies, social structures, and divine entities.

Kaelin Rapport (he/him)

Kaelin Rapport (he/him)

Medical Anthropology/MPH (PhD Candidate Summer 2020)
Research Location: Milwaukee (Millioke), US

KaelinRapport2022@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Kaelin's research explores the phenomenological experiences of penal supervision, the negative health consequences of involvement with the US criminal legal system for Black communities, and the dialectic relationship between racial capitalism and carceral practices/policy.   Key Terms:  Health/Medicine; Inequality; Race/Ethnicity; Embodiment; Post/Colonialism; Biopolitics; Racial Capitalism; Surveillance; Carcerality; Temporality; Spatialization

Sari Ratri

Sari Ratri

Cultural Anthropology (Arryman Scholar 2017/PhD Candidate Fall 2020)

SariRatri2015@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Sari’s reserach interest examines governmental intervention regarding child growth stunting and the knowledge-production embedded in that process, in East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Her project intends to examine registration and record-keeping responsibilities assigned to local health workers apart from their already underpaid therapeutic work. Through this project, she is particularly interested to understand how dominant cultural ideas about health are conveyed when people talk about and reinterpret quantitative evidence collected from counting birth and death events. She receives funding from the Arrymans Fellows and Scholars, ISRSF Jakarta, as well as the Indonesian Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP), the Ministry of Finance, Indonesia.

Sophie Reilly

Sophie Reilly

Archaeology (Doctoral Student Fall 2018)

SophieReilly2024@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Sophie is an archaeologist who employs paleoethnobotanical techniques (study of plant remains) to study ancient foodways. Her dissertation research is focused in the Chachapoyas region of northern Perú from the 14th to the 17th century. Sophie studies food as a way to learn about the everyday lives of the Chachapoyas people during the periods of Inka and Spanish imperialism. She is particularly interested in the ways that imperialism changes people’s access to particular foods and how people develop strategies of resilience in response to imperial structures. Sophie holds a master’s degree from McMaster University, where she studied the consumption of maize and a variety of tuber species in the Middle Horizon (500-1000AD) Lake Titicaca Basin of highland Bolivia; and an undergraduate degree from McGill University. You can follow her on twitter @reillydigs

Roberto Rosado Ramirez

Roberto Rosado Ramirez

Archaeology (PhD Candidate 2016)

rrosado@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Anthropological archaeology; archaeology of reoccupation and reclamation of abandoned sites; settlement abandonment; “post-Collapse” communities in the Maya area; household archaeology; historical archaeology; Mesoamerica

Amrina Rosyada (she/her)

Amrina Rosyada (she/her)

Cultural Anthropology (Arryman Scholar 2019/Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: Indonesia

amrina@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Amrina Rosyada is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University. Her current research interest concerns the intellectual history of anthropology in Indonesia. Using historical anthropology, she looks at how anthropologists study Indonesia throughout history: from the era of colonial scholars to native Indonesian anthropologists. She is also exploring the sociopolitical causes correlated to this disciplinary shift and its impacts, especially in how Indonesian societies are portrayed and studied. Her academic essays have been published in The Conversation Indonesia and Inside Indonesia.

Calen Ryan

Calen Ryan

Biological Anthropology (PhD 2020)

CPR@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Calen’s work integrates bioinformatic analyses of high-throughput genetic and epigenetic data with longitudinal population studies to understand the biological impacts of reproduction and the long-term health effects of early life environments. You can find out more about his research through his GoogleScholar page (https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=syQoKggAAAAJ&hl=en), or by following him on Twitter (@CalenRyan).  

Aaron Schoenfeldt

Aaron Schoenfeldt

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2018)

AaronSchoenfeldt2024@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Aaron’s research examines the discursive and spatial processes that aim to rebrand Tulsa, Oklahoma into a cool, inclusive 21st century city. Moreover, he is interested in how this process of reimaging Tulsa intersects with the city’s past history of racial violence and unequal present.

Emily Schwalbe

Emily Schwalbe

Archaeology (PhD Candidate Winter 2020)

EmilySchwalbe2024@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Emily is an archaeology student whose research interests include maritimity and everyday life, hydrosociality, human-environment relationships, and historical archaeology of the Southeastern US and Caribbean. Her dissertation focuses on recreating the submerged infrastructure of South Carolina Lowcountry plantation waterfronts to better understand landscapes of production, control, and communication in the colonial though antebellum periods.

Anuranjan Sethi

Anuranjan Sethi

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2019)

AnuranjanSethi2024@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Anu is broadly interested in the conflicts at the intersections of law, technology, and governance of the Indian economy. His research focuses on the transmutations of global capital as it negotiates the dichotomy of ‘formal’ and ‘informal’ economies in the post-liberalization India. His current project is to understand the political economy dimensions of the Indian government's attempts to promote ‘new money technologies’ as a tool to tackle the problem of the black-money economy.

Atmaezer Hariara Simanjuntak

Atmaezer Hariara Simanjuntak

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2018)
Regional Focus: West Kalimantan, Indonesia

hariara.simanjuntak@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Ara’s research tracks the legacies of colonial plantations in the Global South and how they emerge in the present both ideologically and materially. Combining ethnographic and archival research, he argues that deciphering the plantation logic remains critical to understand violent underdevelopment processes in postcolonial nation-states. This was made possible through the plantation’s ability to create and manage differently valued environments, bodies, and social relations, which, in turn, sustain capitalist accumulation. Ara is also interested in the political economy of financial systems, multispecies relations, and emerging forms of hope and morality among indigenous laborers in West Kalimantan, Indonesia Twitter Handle: @arasimanjuntakk  

Craig Stevens (he/him)

Craig Stevens (he/him)

Archaeology (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus: Liberia, London

craigstevens2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Transcultural Black identity formation in the Back-to-Africa movement; African and African Diasporic solidarity via expressive and material cultures.

Stephen Sullivan

Stephen Sullivan

Cultural Anthropology (PhD Candidate Summer 2019)

StephenSullivan2016@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Aesthetics and political economy, queer and feminist theory, anthropology of sound, cultural performance, urban anthropology; United States

Keegan Terek

Keegan Terek

Linguistic Anthropology (PhD Candidate Summer 2019)

KeeganTerek2016@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Keegan is broadly interested in how, through processes of migration, forms of language and other socially meaningful behavior become linked to figures of personhood, especially those differentiated in terms of gender and sexuality. Along these lines, his dissertation project investigates how sexual orientation and gender identity refugees living in Amman, Jordan, use stylized forms of speech and self-presentation to navigate both institutionalized asylum procedures and the precariousness of their everyday lives.

Elijiah Watson

Elijiah Watson

Biological Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2020)
Regional Focus:

elijahwatson2025@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Elijah's research broadly focuses on maternal and child health, with a particular interest in maternal stress, child growth and development, infant feeding, and food and water insecurity.

Jin Xiong

Jin Xiong

Cultural Anthropology (Doctoral Student Fall 2018)

JinXiong2023@u.northwestern.edu
Research Content: Jin Xiong (aka Portia) is a student of the PhD/JD joint program at Northwestern University. As a sociocultural anthropologist, she has broad interest in areas including im/mobilities, family, childhood, development, gender, sexuality, feminism, medical anthropology and anthropology of law. Specifically, her doctoral project looks at how im/mobilities shape and reshape rising China's childhood and family through the lens of the lived experiences of rural Liushou Ertong (Left-behind Children) in central China, and how global legal discourses such as human rights and children's rights unfold in poorly resourced rural communities. For her, anthropology and law are Yin and Yang (united opposites) in the sense that the former pushes people to explore the complexities of human life while the latter requires the art of "less is more".

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